NOT ALL THOSE WHO WANDER ARE LOST” 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   ~ J.R.R. TOLKIEN  

NOT ALL THOSE WHO WANDER ARE LOST” 

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                   ~ J.R.R. TOLKIEN  

Note From Rolf

Dear fellow hiker, whether you're an experienced nomad who has traversed the globe, or someone who is embarking on a Camino for the very first time, it's easy to feel daunted by the task of planning your trip. 


I have created the following  PDF guides to accompany you on your Camino.

Regardless of your budget or preferred travel style, my guides have got you covered. From sumptuous luxury hotels to cozy, budget-friendly albergues, I've included a wide range of accommodation options and  the best places to indulge in the local cuisine, quench your thirst, and explore the hidden gems of your destination.

The guides have clickable Google Map links for the hotels and restaurants, so be sure you have the Google Maps app installed on your device.

  I wish you a Buen Camino!

Camino FAQ'S



The Frances is 790 Km – 490 Miles from SJPP and typically take about 30 to 40 days to walk
The Portuguese da Costa and Central are about 350 km and take 10 to 14 days.
The Camino del Norte is 850km – 513 Miles and takes about 35 to 43 days
The Via de la Plata is 1007 km – 620 Miles and takes about 45 to 55 days
The Camino Primitivo is 315 km – 195 Miles and can be done in 12 to 18 days
The Ingles is 120 km – 75 Miles and takes 5 to 7 days to walk

Many people choose to walk shorter sections of the Camino instead of the entire route. Most Spaniards start their Camino Frances in Sarria 113 km or Portugués in Tui 116 km.

While the timing ultimately depends on individual preferences, there are some general considerations to keep in mind. Ultimately, the best season to walk the Camino de Santiago is a personal decision based on factors such as weather preferences, tolerance for crowds, and the type of experience you seek.

Spring (March to June): This season is popular for walking the Camino due to milder weather, blooming landscapes, and fewer crowds compared to the summer months. The temperatures are generally comfortable for walking, making it an ideal time to enjoy the journey.

Summer (June to August) It’s important to note that the summer months, particularly July and August, tend to be the busiest and warmest periods along the Camino. While some people enjoy the lively atmosphere during this time, others may find the crowds and high temperatures less desirable.

Fall (September to October): Similar to spring, the fall season offers pleasant weather and beautiful scenery. Many pilgrims prefer this time of year to avoid the summer crowds and the potential heat. The autumn colors can also add a special touch to the pilgrimage experience.

Winter (October to February) is ideal if you want fewer pilgrims and fewer acommodation choices. But if don’t mind a bit of rain or cold weather it still is a great time to walk. Walking the Camino de Santiago in winter can be a unique and rewarding experience, but it requires careful preparation. The winter months, particularly January and February, are less crowded, allowing for a more solitary and reflective journey. It’s essential to be well-equipped for the colder weather and potential snowfall.

Everyone has their own favorite camino. Which the best one is really depends on what you are looking for or how much time you have. The best Camino de Santiago route ultimately depends on your personal preferences, physical abilities, and the experience you’re seeking. Here are some popular Camino routes to consider:

Camino Francés: This is the most traditional and well-traveled route, offering a diverse landscape and a wide range of accommodations. It’s ideal for first-time pilgrims and those seeking a social experience.

Camino Portugués: Known for its coastal and inland routes, the Camino Portugués is a scenic option with historical significance. It’s a good choice for those who prefer a bit less crowded path.

Camino del Norte: This route follows the northern coast of Spain, offering stunning ocean views and a more challenging terrain. It’s suitable for experienced hikers and individuals who appreciate natural beauty.

Camino Primitivo: As one of the oldest Camino routes, the Camino Primitivo is characterized by its rugged terrain and unspoiled landscapes. It’s a great option for adventurous pilgrims seeking a less-traveled path.

When choosing the best Camino de Santiago route, consider factors such as distance, difficulty, scenery, and the type of experience you hope to have.

Walking the Camino is not quite as cheap as you would expect. The exact figure for the total cost of walking the Camino de Santiago, can vary greatly depending on individual preferences and circumstances. However, many pilgrims budget around €25-50 per day for a modest but comfortable pilgrimage experience. A bed in an Albergue will cost from €10 to €25 a night, and eating a Menu del Dia or Pilgrims Menu will set you back another €10 to €15.

The credential, also known as the “pilgrim’s passport” or “credencial del peregrino” in Spanish, is a document that serves as both a record of your journey and a means of identification along the Camino de Santiago pilgrimage routes.The credential contains your personal details, including your name and nationality. It serves as a form of identification, especially when staying in pilgrim accommodations (albergues) along the Camino.
You can obtain a credential from various sources before starting your Camino journey. These include pilgrim associations, churches, hostels, tourist offices, and some online resources such as Casa Ivar.

Remember to pack as lightly as possible, prioritizing essentials and versatile items. It’s also helpful to check the weather forecast for your planned route and season to adjust your packing list accordingly. Additionally, keep in mind that laundry facilities are available at most all albergues or hostels.
Please see the packing list section and check list below.

The Camino de Santiago is a network of pilgrimages leading to the shrine of the apostle Saint James the Great in the Cathedral of Santiago de Compostela in Galicia, northwest Spain.

Camino Guides

Camino Francés

This Guide Covers:
Camino Francés
St Jean Pied de Port to Santiago in 33 Stages
Includes:
St Jean Pied de Port
Roncesvalles
Pamplona
Logrono
Burgos
Leon
Sarria
Santiago de Compostela

Camino de Invierno

This Guide Covers:
Camino de Invierno
Ponferrada to Santiago in 10 Stages
Includes:
Ponferrada
Monforte de Lemos
Santiago de Compostela

Camino Finisterre

This Guide Covers:
Camino de Finisterre
Santiago to Finisterre  in 3 Stages
Santiago to Muxia in 3 Stages


Includes:
Santiago de Compostela
Finisterre
Muxia

Camino Português Central - Porto

This Guide Covers:
Camino Português - Central Route
Porto to Santiago  in 12 Stages
Includes:
Porto
Tui
Santiago de Compostela

Camino Português - Lisbon

This Guide Covers:
Camino Português - Lisbon
Lisbon to Santiago via Porto in 20 Stages
Includes:
Lisbon
Tomar
Porto
Vigo
Santiago de Compostela

Camino Português da Costa - Porto

This Guide Covers:
Camino Português - Coastal Route
Porto to Santiago  in 10 Stages
Includes:
Porto
Vigo
Santiago de Compostela

Camino Primitivo

Camino Primitivo
This Guide Covers:
Camino Primitivo
Oviedo to Santiago in 12 Stages
Includes:
Oviedo
Pola de Allende
Lugo
Santiago de Compostela

Camino del Norte

This Guide Covers:
Camino del Norte
Irun to Santiago in 31 Stages
Includes:
Irun
San Sebastian
Bilbao
Santander

Gijon
Santiago de Compostela

Via de la Plata

This Guide Covers:
Camino Via de la Plata
Seville to Santiago in 37 Stages
Includes:
Sevilla
Zafra
Merida
Caceres
Salamanca
Zamora
Ouerense
Santiago de Compostela

Camino Sanabrés

This Guide Covers:
Camino Sanabrés
Seville to Santiago in 14 Stages
Includes:
Puebla de Sanabria
Ouerense
Santiago de Compostela

Camino Ingles

This Guide Covers:
Camino Ingles
A Coruña to Santiago in 3 Stages
El Ferrol to Santiago in 4 Stages
Includes:
A Coruña       El Ferrol
Segude          Pontedueme    
                           Betanzos  
Santiago de Compostela

San Salvador

This Guide Covers:
Camino San Salvador
Oviedo to Leon in 5 Stages
Includes:
Oviedo
Leon

Camino Packing Guide


Two of the biggest mistakes people make when setting off on the Camino is overplaning and overpacking.

I myself was very guilty of this on my first Camino, this is why I am including a basic packing checklist as a guideline for you to follow so that you do not make the same mistake I made.
 
Weight is the biggest enemy when walking, if you don’t pay attention to how much you are carrying in your backpack, sooner or later your back or feet will pay the price.



A good rule of thumb is that your backpack should not weigh more than 10% of your body weight. If you stick to that rule you will definitely have a much more pleasant and easy walk. And your feet and back will thank you!


Camino Videos

Camino Frances - Spain

This video is about:
The Camino Francés (French Way), a summer walk on the most popular pilgrimage route from St Jean, France. Typically it takes at least four to five weeks to cover the 790 km long route from Saint Jean Pied de Port to Santiago de Compostela.
Run Time: 1h 18 Min

Camino Francés - Spain

This video is about:
The Camino Francés (French Way) starting in Roncesvalles, Spain in the winter. Typically it takes at least four weeks to cover the 755 km long route from Roncesvalles to Santiago de Compostela, allowing for a few days rest days along the way.
Run Time: 43.22 Min

Camino Português Central - Portugal

This video is about:
The Camino Português Central (Central Way), a popular Camino de Santiago route, with the most deep-rooted historical tradition. Typically it takes at least four weeks to cover the 260 km long route from Porto to Santiago de Compostela, allowing for a few days rest days along the way.
Run Time: 40 Min

Camino Português - Portugal

This video is about:
The Camino Português (Portuguese Way), a popular Camino de Santiago route, with the most deep-rooted historical tradition. Typically it takes at least four weeks to cover the 675 km long route from Lisbon to Santiago de Compostela, allowing for a few days rest days along the way.
Run Time: 8 Min

Camino Primitivo - Spain

This video is about:
The Camino Primitivo is the original pilgrimage route in Spain, with the most deep-rooted historical tradition. Known to be one of the most difficult but picturesque pilgrimage walks. It takes about two weeks to cover the 320 km long route from Oviedo to Santiago de Compostela.
Run Time: 33.22 Min

Camino Via de la Plata - Spain

This video is about: 
The Camino Via de la Plata is a South to North pilgrimage route on the Camino de Santiago in Spain. Known to be one of the longest  but most picturesque pilgrimage walks. It takes about six weeks to cover the 1007 km long route from Seville  to Santiago de Compostela.
Run Time: 1H.15 Min

Camino Sanabrés - Spain

This video is about: 
The Camino Sanabrés pilgrimage route on the Camino de Santiago in Spain. Is a variant of the Via de la Plata which is known to be one of the longest and most picturesque pilgrimage walks. It takes about six weeks to cover the 1007 km long route from Seville to Santiago de Compostela. The Sanabrés takes  about14 days and about 300 kilometers.
Run Time: 40 Min

About Rolf

   Rolf Magener, originally from South Africa, is a passionate globetrotter who, for the past 18 years, has undertaken a continuous journey across the world. His travels have taken him to more than 125 countries and all seven continents several times. 


  He thrives on seeking adventure in the most remote corners of the planet, whether it's navigating the Amazon River, exploring Antarctica, or embarking on 11 reflective Camino de Santiago pilgrimages in Spain within the last three years.


   In addition to his adventurous pursuits, Rolf dedicates substantial periods to silent meditation in secluded monasteries and devotes his time to volunteering at places like Mother Teresa's in Calcutta. 


   When he's not globe-trotting for adventure, Rolf shares his entrepreneurial expertise in his 9 books, speaking at conferences and consulting with companies on business development strategies. With a track record of founding multiple successful businesses.


    Rolf  has dedicated more than 25 years to studying the success mindset. He has developed several training systems that distill his extensive knowledge. These systems are specifically designed to guide individuals towards their "true north" and assist them in achieving their ultimate "dream life."

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